Why: The leggy blonde provides a tres chic mix of outfit inspiration – her personal style definitely has that insouciant French vibe – and trend and brand lowdowns. The ‘boutique’ section of her site is a one-stop shop for the pieces she loves – and we also like the fact she has regular wardrobe clearouts via Vestiaire so true Camille-alikes can snap up her actual clothes…


So his shoes show only his fashion taste. The Sun (2017)So why is the back three back in fashion? Times, Sunday Times (2016)She goes on to cite her mum as one of her fashion icons. Times, Sunday Times (2016) High fashion excluded the masses and enabled its wearers to lord it over the regular folk. Times, Sunday Times (2016)So who is the youngster taking the fashion world by storm? The Sun (2017)If anyone is still asking if fashion illustration is art, here is their answer. Times, Sunday Times (2016)The idea for a high-tech fashion brand was formed. Times, Sunday Times (2016)If you had to make one for a particular fashion house, what would it be like? Times, Sunday Times (2016)By giving something back, fashion companies do more than say thanks. Times, Sunday Times (2016)That could well be his recognition of the fact that, one day, she will be the most powerful woman in fashion. Times, Sunday Times (2016)
Although tailors and dressmakers were no doubt responsible for many innovations, and the textile industry certainly led many trends, the history of fashion design is normally understood to date from 1858 when the English-born Charles Frederick Worth opened the first true haute couture house in Paris. These fashion houses have to adhere to standards such as keeping at least twenty employees engaged in making the clothes, showing two collections per year at fashion shows, and presenting a certain number of patterns to costumers.[23] Since then, the idea of the fashion designer as a celebrity in his or her own right has become increasingly dominant.[24]

Make sure your beauty blog name is clear to spell: I have seen many blog names that just make it impossible to pronounce them loud. Or if called out loud it will cause a confusion.For example, my own blog name is DigitalGYD.com which I chose because the name I wanted (DigitalGuide.com) was already taken. Now I regret because this name neither suits my now content and is hard for people to understand when called out loud (often misunderstood with DigitalGuide or Digital Geed). *FacePalm*
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I think what is missing in the blogging world is passion for experimenting! For me is not so much a design beautiful, like a mental shock, something crazy that makes you shake. The absurdity is able to move brains. The impudence is capable of stirring mountains. The best way to do something different is expressing your truth, knowing yourself, because everyone is different. One idea: put an artist in your life!: Squeeze all the fruits that have the reach, naked but dressed, and enjoy putting your juice in the network…

Building brand awareness and credibility is a key implication of good public relations. In some cases, great hype is built about new designers' collections before they are released into the market, due to the immense exposure generated by practitioners.[57] Social media, such as blogs, micro blogs, podcasts, photo and video sharing sites have all become increasingly important to fashion public relations.[58] The interactive nature of these platforms allows practitioners to engage and communicate with the public in real time, and tailor their clients' brand or campaign messages to the target audience. With blogging platforms such as Instagram, Tumblr, Wordpress, and other sharing sites, bloggers have emerged as expert fashion commentators, shaping brands and having a great impact on what is ‘on trend’.[59] Women in the fashion public relations industry such as Sweaty Betty PR founder Roxy Jacenko and Oscar de la Renta's PR girl Erika Bearman, have acquired copious followers on their social media sites, by providing a brand identity and a behind the scenes look into the companies they work for.


I am Angie Cox and I started YLF after 15 years in the fashion industry as a designer, retail buyer and consultant. These days I'm a fashion stylist to individual clients and I write daily about personal style. You can become a YLF member to join us in the forum or to collect finds, but you're equally welcome as an anonymous reader. Everyone, members and non-members alike, can subscribe to email updates and our monthly newsletter. 

Building brand awareness and credibility is a key implication of good public relations. In some cases, great hype is built about new designers' collections before they are released into the market, due to the immense exposure generated by practitioners.[57] Social media, such as blogs, micro blogs, podcasts, photo and video sharing sites have all become increasingly important to fashion public relations.[58] The interactive nature of these platforms allows practitioners to engage and communicate with the public in real time, and tailor their clients' brand or campaign messages to the target audience. With blogging platforms such as Instagram, Tumblr, Wordpress, and other sharing sites, bloggers have emerged as expert fashion commentators, shaping brands and having a great impact on what is ‘on trend’.[59] Women in the fashion public relations industry such as Sweaty Betty PR founder Roxy Jacenko and Oscar de la Renta's PR girl Erika Bearman, have acquired copious followers on their social media sites, by providing a brand identity and a behind the scenes look into the companies they work for.
The definition of fashion and anti-fashion is as follows: Anti-fashion is fixed and changes little over time. Anti-fashion is different depending on the cultural or social group one is associated with or where one lives, but within that group or locality the style changes little. Fashion changes very quickly and is not affiliated with one group or area of the world but is spread out throughout the world wherever people can communicate easily with each other. For example, Queen Elizabeth II's 1953 coronation gown is an example of anti-fashion because it is traditional and does not change over any period whereas a gown from fashion designer Dior's collection of 1953 is fashion because the style will change every season as Dior comes up with a new gown to replace the old one. In the Dior gown the length, cut, fabric, and embroidery of the gown change from season to season. Anti-fashion is concerned with maintaining the status quo while fashion is concerned with social mobility. Time is expressed in terms of continuity in anti-fashion and as change in fashion. Fashion has changing modes of adornment while anti-fashion has fixed modes of adornment. Indigenous and peasant modes of adornment are an example of anti-fashion. Change in fashion is part of the larger system and is structured to be a deliberate change in style.[64]
The fashion industry is seeing how 3D printing technology has influenced designers such as Iris Van Herpen and Kimberly Ovitz. These designers have been heavily experimenting and developing 3D printed couture pieces. As the technology grows, the 3D printers will become more accessible to designers and eventually consumers, which could potentially shape the fashion industry entirely.
^ Wright, M. (2011). How premium fashion brands are maximising their social media ROI. Mashable. Retrieved from www.mashable.com/2011/02/11/fashion-brands-social-media-roi/ in Cassidy, L. & Fitch, K. (2013) Beyond the Catwalk: Fashion Public Relations and Social Media in Australia, Asia Pacific Public Relations Journal, vol. 14, No. 1 & 2, Murdoch University.

Suggestion: This post talks about the difference between being thin and being anorexic, about how we should reevaluate what “healthy” body image means. Saying “Thin & Proud” may ruffle feathers, even if all women should be proud of their figures. I would focus on examples of how the press/media/culture is confusing anorexia with natural thinness, and reflect that in the post title.


There has been great debate about politics' place in fashion and traditionally, the fashion industry has maintained a rather apolitical stance.[72] Considering the U.S.'s political climate in the surrounding months of the 2016 presidential election, during 2017 fashion weeks in London, Milan, New York, Paris and São Paulo amongst others, many designers took the opportunity to take political stances leveraging their platforms and influence to reach the masses.[73][74]
1 : to give shape or form to : to make, construct, or create (something) usually with careful attention or by the use of imagination and ingenuity fashion a lamp from an old churn a figure fashioned from clay … delegating to the commander-in-chief the power to fashion the rules of the military justice system …— Fred Strasser Up there in the mountains old ladies … are still hooking rugs … and fashioning dainty dolls out of corn shucks.— Richard Atcheson
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