^ Noricks, C. (2006). From style to strategy: An exploratory investigation of public relations practice in the fashion industry. Unpublished master's thesis, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA. in Cassidy, L. & Fitch, K. (2013) Beyond the Catwalk: Fashion Public Relations and Social Media in Australia, Asia Pacific Public Relations Journal, vol. 14, No. 1 & 2, Murdoch University.
Suggestions:  I found the usage of “Dressing up the…” to be a bit passive. A stronger post title would be “Dress up the…” but then it would be using two of the same words (even if they have different meanings, “dress” the verb and “dress” the noun). I would use a different word, like, “Glam,” or something along those lines to differentiate. The post was good, but it could become an evergreen post, if she ad incorporated several ways to make that LBD pop.

Susie Lau's Style Bubble has been going for over a decade and includes intelligent articles on everything from underground global fashion talent to perfume. She also provides fascinating behind-the-scenes pieces on the real work it takes to create a beautiful Chanel garment. Then there's the tongue-in-cheek Man Repeller run by Leandra Medine and her team. Its smart, witty take on fashion is refreshing. And if over-the-top clothes aren't your thing, we've also found plenty of bloggers with more pared-back styles for the minimalists. 
no pl (= manner) → Art (und Weise) f; (in the) Indian fashion → auf Indianerart, nach Art der Indianer; in the usual fashion → wie üblich; in a similar fashion → auf ähnliche Weise; to behave in a strange fashion → sich merkwürdig verhalten; did it work/have you translated it? — after a fashion → hat es geklappt/hast du es übersetzt? — so einigermaßen; to do something after or in a fashion → etw recht und schlecht machen; I can cook after a fashion → ich kann so einigermaßen kochen; a novel after or in the fashion of D.H. Lawrence → ein Roman im Stil von D. H. Lawrence; in this fashion → auf diese Weise, so

Although tailors and dressmakers were no doubt responsible for many innovations, and the textile industry certainly led many trends, the history of fashion design is normally understood to date from 1858 when the English-born Charles Frederick Worth opened the first true haute couture house in Paris. These fashion houses have to adhere to standards such as keeping at least twenty employees engaged in making the clothes, showing two collections per year at fashion shows, and presenting a certain number of patterns to costumers.[23] Since then, the idea of the fashion designer as a celebrity in his or her own right has become increasingly dominant.[24]


The beginning in Europe of continual and increasingly rapid change in clothing styles can be fairly reliably dated. Historians, including James Laver and Fernand Braudel, date the start of Western fashion in clothing to the middle of the 14th century,[12][13] though they tend to rely heavily on contemporary imagery[14] and illuminated manuscripts were not common before the fourteenth century.[15] The most dramatic early change in fashion was a sudden drastic shortening and tightening of the male over-garment from calf-length to barely covering the buttocks,[16] sometimes accompanied with stuffing in the chest to make it look bigger.
As a blogger, I know how hard it is to come up with blog posts ideas everyday. I aim to write at least 1 blog post a day because I like to have my blog posts scheduled and I like to stay ‘switched on’. I struggle to get back into the swing of things when I take time off, so I try not to stay away for too long. I decided to write-up this post, sharing 30 blog post ideas for the month of June, and I hope someone finds these ideas useful.

Even though they are often used together, the term fashion differs from clothes and costume, where the first describes the material and technical garment, whereas the second has been relegated to special senses like fancy-dress or masquerade wear. Fashion instead describes the social and temporal system that "activates" dress as a social signifier in a certain time and context. Philosopher Georgio Agamben connects fashion to the current intensity of the qualitative moment, to the temporal aspect the Greek called kairos, whereas clothes belong to the quantitative, to what the Greek called chronos.[4]
I just entered this whole blogging world and your website is saving my life – well, that’s a bit extreme. But yes. My life is being saved. There are so many clear, witty explanations of how and why I need to do particular things that I *could* spend all day simply pouring over the info you provide. But I won’t. Because you taught me that I was avoiding actually creating content. I am now in the process of figuring out how to do a good logo and the last comment I read addressed that very problem. Fantastic! Now I’m off to purchase and figure out Aweber. Ta!

There are many examples of cultural appropriation in fashion. In many instances, designers can be found using aspects of culture inappropriately, in most cases taking traditional clothing from middle eastern, African, and Hispanic culture and adding it to their runway fashion.[91] Some examples are in a 2018 Gucci runway show, white models wore Sikh headdresses, causing a lot of backlash. Victoria’s secret was also under fire for putting traditional native headdresses on their models during a lingerie runway show.
Suggestions:  I found the usage of “Dressing up the…” to be a bit passive. A stronger post title would be “Dress up the…” but then it would be using two of the same words (even if they have different meanings, “dress” the verb and “dress” the noun). I would use a different word, like, “Glam,” or something along those lines to differentiate. The post was good, but it could become an evergreen post, if she ad incorporated several ways to make that LBD pop.
Even though they are often used together, the term fashion differs from clothes and costume, where the first describes the material and technical garment, whereas the second has been relegated to special senses like fancy-dress or masquerade wear. Fashion instead describes the social and temporal system that "activates" dress as a social signifier in a certain time and context. Philosopher Georgio Agamben connects fashion to the current intensity of the qualitative moment, to the temporal aspect the Greek called kairos, whereas clothes belong to the quantitative, to what the Greek called chronos.[4]

Many fashion designers have come under fire over the years for what is known as tokenism. Designer or editors will add one or two members on an underrepresented group to help them appear as inclusive and diverse, and to also help them give the illusion that they have equality.[89] This idea of tokenism helps designers avoid accusations of racism, sexism, body shaming, etc.[89]


no pl (= manner) → Art (und Weise) f; (in the) Indian fashion → auf Indianerart, nach Art der Indianer; in the usual fashion → wie üblich; in a similar fashion → auf ähnliche Weise; to behave in a strange fashion → sich merkwürdig verhalten; did it work/have you translated it? — after a fashion → hat es geklappt/hast du es übersetzt? — so einigermaßen; to do something after or in a fashion → etw recht und schlecht machen; I can cook after a fashion → ich kann so einigermaßen kochen; a novel after or in the fashion of D.H. Lawrence → ein Roman im Stil von D. H. Lawrence; in this fashion → auf diese Weise, so
×