Surprisingly, wearing Sunday’s best was not part of the ’20s culture unless a woman was poor and only had one nice outfit– then, certainly, she MUST wear that to church. Otherwise, whatever she wore for streetwear she also wore to church as long as it was modest with long sleeves and a below the knee hemline. If a sleeveless dress was worn a light shawl, wrap or jacket acted as a light coverup. Simple, non-distracting clothing was appreciated in church. Women were required to wear a hat, gloves and matching purse. These three accessories polished her look and gave her permission to add personality to an otherwise conservative dress. Shop 20s dresses. 
It’s rather easy to describe the sporty fashion style: it’s sporty! Girls will typically wear some popular sport companies like Adidas or Nike and will always have runner shoes (or similar style shoes) on. They prefer a simple and subtle look that oozes ‘sports’, with plain colors like white, black, and gray being BIG hits. They won’t strive for anything fashionable or flashy and would prefer sweatpants, tight runner pants, and basic tees. Don’t forget the ponytail to finish it off!

Another influence the émigrés had been in bringing their traditional style of embroidery to Paris. Russian “peasant” embroidery appeared on extremely sophisticated outfits, and in some cases mingled with the traditions and motifs from many other countries. It was called “Oriental” but it encompassed designs from many countries. The Ballet Russe had widely introduced this fantasy style to Paris and the city was also fascinated by black jazz bands and the dancing of Josephine Baker. This admiration meant that black artists and culture also influenced the fashions of the time.
It’s not true that women threw away their corsets during the 1920s. They didn’t need to make themselves some tiny waists and jutting bosoms, but anyone in possession of any kind of bosom or bottom needed to do the opposite and flatten them right out. So, elasticated corsets were created to do just that, and mould the body to the desired tube shape. Theses foundation garments also existed separately, so in 1920s fashion, a flattening bra and/or hip and bottom reducing girdle could be worn. Sometimes these were worn directly against bare skin, or sometimes on top of the traditional chemise, a loose fitting shift in cotton or silk used as a base to prevent chafing.

Simple Makeup Tutorial from 1960 Vintage 1960s makeup tips from Hollywood actress Sandra Dee. Her teacher at Universal is the great Bud Westmore. The secret says Sandra is to look natural Start with Nails So her hands look prettier and nails won’t split, Sandra Dee applies polish, in pale shades of pearl. Then she uses colorless sealer over all Foundation…


Ultra Violet may be the Pantone Colour of the Year for 2018, but street style stars preferred a softer take on the trend this season. Rocking a range of shades from the lavender family, fashionistas proved that light purple is seriously stylish. Whether worn in the form of boots, dresses, coats or even head-to-toe ensembles, the flattering and feminine colour added a lovely touch to looks. Try it for yourself if you’re after something subtle yet exciting.
Many fashion magazines focus on expensive photo shoots featuring world-famous models and photographers modeling incredibly expensive clothing. On occasion, however, readers are treated to illustrated work either accompanying the models or taking over the pages entirely. Notable examples include the various international versions of Vogue magazine, Nylon magazine, and more.

Why: Hailing from Sao Paulo, Helena Bordon is one of Brazil’s most influential style bloggers. She started her fashion education from a young age courtesy of her mother, Donata Meirelles, the style director of Vogue Brazil. When Helena was just 7 years old, she’d join her mum at all the top fashion shows and eventually interned at Valentino. Now, Helena is co-founder of Brazilian high street fashion chain 284, as well as finding the time to run her eponymous blog, helenabordon.com, which offers Helena’s insider style, travel and beauty tips. Disclaimer: expect holiday envy.

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