Silent film actress Colleen Moore basically invented the bob. Women around the world copied the black block cut that she and a few other early adopting actresses made popular, making her one of the greatest beauty influencers of all time – although 1960s fashion would see an even shorter popular style in the pixie crop. She’s pretty much the reason so many of us opt for bob hairstyles today. Colleen loved her bob so much, in fact, that she kept that haircut until the day she died in 1988. Talk about a signature style…

Giorgio Armani, an outstanding Italian fashion designer, particularly noted for his menswear for his clean, tailored lines. He formed his company, Armani, in 1975, and by 2001 was acclaimed as the most successful designer to come out of Italy, with an annual turnover of $1.6 billion and a personal fortune of $7 billion as of 2012. Armani is also the first ever designer to ban models who has a Body Mass Index under 18. He is truly a living legend and a great fashion designer.
Everything about Tami Reed is fascinating. Her personality, aura, wit and humor, fashion sense and everything else that caught the attention of big brands in no time. She had a substantial social media presence even before she turned into a fashion blogger. Tami wanted to do something concrete, and that’s how it all started. From being a red-carpet consultant to an entrepreneur, Tami Reed is a go-getter! For more inspiration and to stay updated with everything big happening in Hollywood or otherwise when it comes to fashion, check her blog.

One popular style was the buckle pump. Made over a stylish medium round toe in black patent leather, the shoe had an antique silver finished buckle, which concealed an elastic gore, making adjustment easy. A dressier look would be the stunning loop strap, that was made from Autumn Brown mesh leather trimming on the vamp and quarter. The light-colored leather quarter was carefully made not to soil hosiery and they had a spike heel.

Pretty much everyone I interviewed has a good, well-viewed social media presence. Whether on Instagram, Behance, Twitter, Facebook, or other sites, each artist connects with their public, regularly updating with artwork, prints or products they produce themselves, or in-process pieces meant to engage the viewer and get more potential clients to their accounts and portfolios. When it comes to niche design jobs, you want to do everything you can to sell your work on your terms and get the word out that you’re available for hire or have artwork for sale.


Having had a very meh couple of weeks, I'm really looking forward to kicking the internet's butt next week 👊🏼 Gonna shoot with both @chloeplumstead and @bangonstyle, get my nails did and maybe just maybe find where I've misplaced the part of my tripod that connects my camera to it so that maybe I can film again 😂 FFS why is it always me losing and breaking things, eh? 😳😅
This articles should help you with some ideas and pictures about plus size fashions: https://vintagedancer.com/1920s/1920s-plus-size-fashion-history/ A middle age woman would have worn the same fashions as the younger set but a little bit less fussy details. She would not wear ruffles and bright colors or “cute” prints. Solid colors, simple trim, and a shape that flattered her body were the only rules to follow.

Giorgio Armani, an outstanding Italian fashion designer, particularly noted for his menswear for his clean, tailored lines. He formed his company, Armani, in 1975, and by 2001 was acclaimed as the most successful designer to come out of Italy, with an annual turnover of $1.6 billion and a personal fortune of $7 billion as of 2012. Armani is also the first ever designer to ban models who has a Body Mass Index under 18. He is truly a living legend and a great fashion designer.
It covers many aspects of men's fashion, from Menswear 101 to Outfit of the Day to Dressiquette. For instance, there are fascinating articles entitled “Braces or Belt, Never Both,” “Match Leather to Leather and Metal to Metal,” and “Dressiquette – Your socks should match your pants.” (Although your socks should match your pants, not your shoes, Sergio believes you only need to worry about this in formal situations – he prefers high-contrast brightly colored socks).
The Chriselle Factor on Youtube has close to 29 million views, and over half a million subscribers, which is why she is undeniably the biggest fashion blogger and expert there is. Even though she has been associated with big names in the fashion industry, she started the blog as a journal to share her personal style and musings, and she turned into a Youtube content creator to educate, share, and inspire women.
It is all about showing off your best features. Let all the best things about your out there to get the attention of male. Mostly accompanied by heels, shorts or tight skirts, this style leaves the bare minimum for imagination. Exposure is to be at the maximum and as much as skin is shown. Tight fitting tops are chosen to show off the features like breasts and stomach. This is the type of fashion which is not every woman’s cup of tea. You got a lot of guts to pull off this one.
Athleisure is the trend that keeps giving, and its latest offering is as unexpected as it is stylish. The bike shorts were worn with blazers by many style-savvy showgoers this fashion month. Offering a fresh blend of sportswear and tailoring, the look was both striking and chic. Of course, while it may not be appropriate for either the office or the gym, the outfit is perfect for strutting the streets or attending Sunday brunch with your best friends. So, don’t be afraid to try it for yourself.
Back in the 80s, curls were 100% the hairstyle to have. Straighteners were out and curlers, crimpers and perms were everywhere. Girls loved their curls and why not? They brought volume, life and waves to their hair. Now, thirty years later, everything retro is back in fashion and women everywhere are realizing that the 80s rocked – especially when it came to fashion.
Arty as the names suggest, invokes the independent creativity of the person. These are usually the ones who want to make a statement of their own by the clothes they wear. Most of the times, they are the creators of their own fashion style. They do not follow the traditional norms and make the path for themselves. The unconventional for of art leads to innovating very many interesting forms of trends which are not restricted by the usual textbook nature of creating fashion.
Shoes and accessories were more dramatic, too. Shoes would be pumps or strap heels in a medium or high height. Stockings would be sheerer and in colors to match the dress. Gloves would also match or be white (and were taken off to eat).  A hat would be whatever is most becoming to the dress, such as a feather trim sun hat or decorative cloche. Learn more about dressing in afternoon party dresses. 
The silhouette at this time was a masculine one with flatter chests that were held down by specially made corsets. Bras weren’t about support as they are now, some were little more than camisoles, some women even went without bras in order to look more flat chested and breasts would therefore sit much lower down the chest wall as a result. Those with a more generous chest size would attempt to bandage their breasts down flat. The “Symington Side Lacer,” was a bra whose sole intention was to do just that. It was created so that both side could be pulled until the chest was flattened with lacing on both sides of the bra.
Surprisingly, wearing Sunday’s best was not part of the ’20s culture unless a woman was poor and only had one nice outfit– then, certainly, she MUST wear that to church. Otherwise, whatever she wore for streetwear she also wore to church as long as it was modest with long sleeves and a below the knee hemline. If a sleeveless dress was worn a light shawl, wrap or jacket acted as a light coverup. Simple, non-distracting clothing was appreciated in church. Women were required to wear a hat, gloves and matching purse. These three accessories polished her look and gave her permission to add personality to an otherwise conservative dress. Shop 20s dresses. 
The first world war was over in Britain in 1918 – of course its immediate effects were going to be felt well into the 1920s, as well as resonating through the entire lives of those who lived through it. During the war women had been catapulted from their roles as almost hidden “domestic angels” into public life and a much wider range of jobs than they had ever had before. This required a wide range of outfits of a comfortable and practical nature that they weren’t about to relinquish.
Whatever the catalyst, fashion illustration is having 'a moment’. It has been fidgeting the industry for some time - perhaps since Nick Knight introduced Helen Downie’s Unskilled Worker into fashion's limelight two years ago, and it’s now truly kicking. Grace Coddington and Michael Robert’s GingerNutz story in our December issue - whose cover itself generated a multitude of illustrated versions that flooded the social channels - stands as definitive proof. The video of Coddington talking about it generated 10,000 views in its first twelve hours on YouTube, while Caroline Stein’s Instagram version of Pat McGrath’s LABS generated 100 likes-a-minute for the first hour it was live. People clearly like looking at it.

“It’s happening now because social media is so hungry for content, but there is so much cold content out there; so much straight product, which has very little emotional resonance with the audience” says Downie, who was discovered by Nick Knight a year after now-famously taking up painting at the age of 48, and now works with Alessandro Michele at Gucci. “Luxury brands have had to find a way to show their collections in a warm way.”

Sports clothes for men included a pair of pants or knickers called plus fours. These knee-length pants were paired with a patterned sweater or pullover vest and a long sleeve button down shirt with the sleeves rolled up. Argyle was a common sweater or vest print as well as a print for tall socks. Clashing colors were in style! An 8 panel cap (newsboy cap) was also worn and a pair of two-tone Oxfords or saddle shoes were snazzy.
“It’s changing, and it’s becoming a much more friendly industry for women particularly,” says Susannah Garrod, who studied fine art at Central Saint Martins and now counts Vogue, Jimmy Choo, Emilia Wickstead and Jessica McCormack as clients as well as contributing to the Fashion Illustration Gallery stable run by William Ling. “Instagram allowed me to record more personal, rather than client-based work - which in turn generated more work ... as a 'jobbing' illustrator it’s been rewarding to be commissioned for work in my own right rather than creating illustrations strictly dictated by the client. These days fashion illustration is appreciated by a more social savvy audience as an art form rather than a 'paint by numbers' necessity to record. People are looking for something different if they commission a fashion illustrator rather than a photographer - it’s no longer the 'poor relation' but an intimate way of interpreting fashion which stands the test of time as a commentary on the industry as a whole.”
Not everyone was a bright young thing in the 1920s, nor did they want to wear the latest fashion of drop waist dresses. Many mature women continued to wear the fashions of 10 years prior to the 1920s. This meant long, modest gowns, in dark rich fabrics. Tall lace up boots or strappy heels were more comfortable for women who grew up wearing them.  Hats were larger as well, not the helmet cloches of the roaring twenties.
Ling agrees. “Illustration has always been outside the contemporary art structure,” he says. “Some call it second rate and of course there is validity to that in some cases - but the art industry has long been a construct of vested interests so talent hasn’t always necessarily been able to get through. Now Instagram is democratising art, but it's also populist - and in that context people have had careers they wouldn't have otherwise had. But there is no doubt it’s working for the audience - people are certainly buying more and illustrators tend to work with designers on collaborations which photographers rarely do. There’s just an additional collectible appeal.”
Gabi Gregg set off on this journey to tackle the infuriating gap for plus size women. She started off a blog about a decade ago to show and pave a path in a way that promotes body positivity while being impeccably stylish, vibrant, and colorful. Her outfits are full of life just like her, and so is her clothing line Premme, which caters to plus sizes. She brought, what she calls ‘the fatkini’, by collaborating with ‘Playful Promises’ and ‘Swimsuits’, and showed us how it’s done. We need more women like her, and thanks to social media, we get to follow her around.
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