The fashion year 1960 was in transition from the conservative fifties to the youth-oriented swinging sixties. The full-skirted swing dress was still the main wardrobe staple for women with the pencil-shaped dress gaining more popularity, especially with an ever shorting hemline. It was in the casual dress that the new youthful silhouette was emerging. More … Read More about 1960s Fashion by Year | Mens and Womens Clothing
Having had a very meh couple of weeks, I'm really looking forward to kicking the internet's butt next week 👊🏼 Gonna shoot with both @chloeplumstead and @bangonstyle, get my nails did and maybe just maybe find where I've misplaced the part of my tripod that connects my camera to it so that maybe I can film again 😂 FFS why is it always me losing and breaking things, eh? 😳😅

Some illustrators are hired for full-time, permanent positions, but many operate as independent freelancers who work on short-term contracts. An understanding of business concepts and a strong network of contacts can help fashion illustrators manage their freelance business and find work. To stand out in this field, illustrators need to polish their skills and develop a personal style.
Modernism brought many changes, with Orientalism influencing western fashion for the first time with “Japonsim,” a type of Japanese influence on more traditional garments. Bold graphics and colourful embroidery were seen on ladies dresses – the Italian futurists influenced fashion during the twenties with bright geometric forms and bright colours. It was an exciting time to be part of the roaring twenties and their fashions still permeate today’s wear – the cloche hat has been having a moment as have fringes and kimono style jackets. The twenties are all around us – still.

This articles should help you with some ideas and pictures about plus size fashions: https://vintagedancer.com/1920s/1920s-plus-size-fashion-history/ A middle age woman would have worn the same fashions as the younger set but a little bit less fussy details. She would not wear ruffles and bright colors or “cute” prints. Solid colors, simple trim, and a shape that flattered her body were the only rules to follow.

It’s not true that women threw away their corsets during the 1920s. They didn’t need to make themselves some tiny waists and jutting bosoms, but anyone in possession of any kind of bosom or bottom needed to do the opposite and flatten them right out. So, elasticated corsets were created to do just that, and mould the body to the desired tube shape. Theses foundation garments also existed separately, so in 1920s fashion, a flattening bra and/or hip and bottom reducing girdle could be worn. Sometimes these were worn directly against bare skin, or sometimes on top of the traditional chemise, a loose fitting shift in cotton or silk used as a base to prevent chafing.

Some women did go without body shaping entirely, or might wear just a very loose silk “bra” (they were not called that at the time) or longer line vest with loose fitting French knickers which seem rather big to us but were extremely brief for the period. A combination teddy could also be worn. In winter, knitted wool jersey versions of these were much warmer. A slip or petticoat, and stockings in silk or rayon, with a garter if it wasn’t already attached to the other undergarments, completed the underwear.

The above describes what we think of as the quintessential “1920s Flapper”. Interestingly, the word “Flapper” was originally used around that time to describe a girl of about 13-19 and only became the term for this kind of woman gradually following the 1920 film “The Flapper”, which follows the (mis)fortunes of a schoolgirl and her fall from grace.

A very chic and youthful looking hat could be close-fitting with a fashionable pieced crown pulled softly to the back. The narrow off-the-face brim was finished with rows of stitching. The smart ostrich fancy on the side was of two shades and finished with grosgrain ribbon. Other styles might feature a high crown fashioned of velvet with an off-the-face flange that was outlined with dainty plush flowers. The band and flange facing was made of silk satin.

“It was the death of the last grand master, René Bouché, in 1963 which really signified the end of classic fashion illustration,” says David Downton, who has almost single handedly kept illustration in the limelight over the last 20 years having sketched in the front row of the couture shows for the last 40 seasons straight; illustrated countless celebrities for Vanity Fair and, in 2009, drawn Cate Blanchett for a record-selling anniversary issue of Australian Vogue - as well as having played “artist in residence” at Claridges for the last decade where he can often be found in Le Fumoir sketching anyone from Julianne Moore or Grace Jones to Michael Caine. “It coincided with the rise of the celebrity photographers - and fashion always voraciously wants what is new.”
Consider the illustrations that still appear on sewing patterns today. While many companies that manufacture sewing patterns have turned to actual photographs of the craft product itself, many of them stick to the age-old style of drawings and paintings showing the pattern designs in completed form on imaginary models. Companies like Simplicity and McCall’s still use fashion illustration on their products, as well as continuing to produce vintage patterns whose packaging design styles have inspired fashion illustrators for decades.

We could all use some fashion inspiration, and that’s why we rounded off some of the best out there. Not all of us can afford designer collections or limited editions, but we can surely pick up from the cues these bloggers give away, and style our outfits to make them look exciting, if anything. Who are your style icons? Do you have fashion gurus you follow? What are your go-to fashion blogs? Let us know by dropping in a text in the comments section below.

A very chic and youthful looking hat could be close-fitting with a fashionable pieced crown pulled softly to the back. The narrow off-the-face brim was finished with rows of stitching. The smart ostrich fancy on the side was of two shades and finished with grosgrain ribbon. Other styles might feature a high crown fashioned of velvet with an off-the-face flange that was outlined with dainty plush flowers. The band and flange facing was made of silk satin.


As with most freelance illustration careers, creativity, organization, dedication, and a love of the subject matter (in this case all things fashion) are necessary skills for illustrators. Projects and clients may vary, but the need for fashion illustration always seems to crop up for a variety of reasons, and fashion illustrators will be there to fill the role.
As women’s style became more relaxed, there was more emphasis than ever before on sportswear and swimwear. We were still a long way off from the bikini here; a staple part of 1940s fashion, it wasn’t invented until 1946. But for the first time women could move freely and actually be active in their activewear, so all in all it was a pretty revolutionary decade.

Another formal suit worn by business executives, politicians, and grooms was the morning suit. It consisted of grey and black striped pants, grey vest, black morning coat, wingtip shirt, tie, and top hat. It was a style that was fading quickly except on special occasions and with the upper classes. It has come back around again today in wedding attire for grooms.
Lips: Deep red, burgundy, plum, raspberry or dark orange tones depending what year of the 1920’s. To get a “bee-bitten” lip-look you need to apply the lipstick like a “cupid bow” exaggerated on both upper and lower part of the lips, but stops quite dramatically before reaching the corners of your mouth. Light colors on the mouth was less flattering in the 20’s.

Back in the 80s, curls were 100% the hairstyle to have. Straighteners were out and curlers, crimpers and perms were everywhere. Girls loved their curls and why not? They brought volume, life and waves to their hair. Now, thirty years later, everything retro is back in fashion and women everywhere are realizing that the 80s rocked – especially when it came to fashion.


Born in January of 1905, this French designer was best known for his distinctive “New Look” silhouette. First shown in 1947; his suits and dresses revolutionized the way women dressed after the Second World War. Today, talented designer John Galliano carries on the legendary designer’s legacy in Paris, where he creates dramatic couture ball gowns, chic prêt-a-porter, and luxurious accessories for Dior. Galliano’s talent and his over-the-top runway shows have ensured that the brand remains strong and viable in today’s world…
Why: While Lesego doesn’t have a blog per se, she does have a very active Instagram full of gorgeous photography and thoughtful captions (she occasionally dabbles in vlogging too). Be it the latest fashion trends, amazing lingerie or even those tricky to style narrow sunglasses, she’s a deft hand at styling and out to destroy any preconceptions of what a curvy girl can and can’t wear.
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